Smoke Detectors

Smoke Detectors SAVE LIVES
LANDLORDS TENANTS AND HOMEOWNERS PLEASE READ

Our discussion began when we received a press release on SMOKE DETECTORS from the International Association of Fire Chiefs which began:

The International Association of Fire Chiefs is pleading with the media to help us inform the public of the high number of house fires with fatalities that continue. Too many people are dying here in the US by fire for a number of reasons.

These include:


  • missing or faulty smoke detector

  • overcrowding

  • illegal apartments

  • carelessness

We gathered over the years, information on Smoke Detectors, Fire Sprinklers, Carbon Monoxide, Fire Extinguishers and Fire Escape plans to remind all we can.. If we can reach just ONE resident – we did good.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE REALLY KILLED OR INJURED BY FIRE

Every year nearly 4,000 Americans die in home fires and approximately 20,000 are injured.
Children and the elderly are especially at risk in home fires because they are less able to escape when there is a fire.




WHAT ABOUT CO – CARBON MONOXIDE
There are approximately 500 CO (Carbon Monoxide) fatalities annually, and many more persons suffer flu-like symptoms from CO exposure.

You can improve the chances that you and your family will survive a home fire or CO leak by installing (your landlord) smoke and CO alarms and knowing what to do if they sound.



THERE ARE MANY LAWS IN EVERY STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT THAT REQUIRE AT LEAST ONE SMOKE DETECTOR AND CO IN EVERY HOME. THEY MUST BE LOCATED PROPERLY. IF YOU RENT, YOUR LANDLORD SHOULD HAVE SUPPLIED YOU WITH ONE. YOU SHOULD TAKE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THE ALARM IS WORKING. MANY LAWS ALSO REQUIRE A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR.

SMOKE DETECTOR Helpful Tip : Pick a holiday or your birthday and replace the batteries each year on that day.

For those that don’t have the patience to read more, see these tips:


  • Check smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to be sure they are working properly.

  • Change the batteries every 6 months or on a special day – your birthday for example.

  • Have an escape plan with a meeting place.

  • DO NOT heat your home with your kitchen stove – risk of fire and carbon monoxide



MORE SUGGESTIONS


SUPPLEMENTAL HEATING DEVICES

Supplemental heating devices should be used and maintained in accordance with manufacturer recommendations. Keep combustibles clear. Do not leave supplemental heating devices unattended.

FIREPLACES WOOD

If you are burning wood in your fireplace, make sure your chimneys are properly maintained. You can die from a chimney fire or from Carbon Monoxide. That goes for your furnace, as well.

CANDLES
If candles are necessary, use them in a safe environment in a fireproof container and away from children. Do not leave them unattended. Better yet – do not burn candles. Do not fall asleep with candles next to your bed. Many people have died when they rolled over and a blanket caught on fire.
AS A LANDLORD I HATE CANDLES. Candles will also leave stains on ceiling or walls. A landlord may hcarge you for such damage.

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ALARMS
If you are a tenant and are renting your home, check your fire alarm. Make sure you have at least one or more. Your landlord may not do it. DO NOT WAIT.

GET ASSISTANCE
If you need a smoke detector or carbon monoxide detector and do not have the money for one, contact your local fire department. There are many, many programs to help the poor and elderly.

DON’T LEAVE YOUR ALARM in the PACKAGE IT CAME IN
If you buy a smoke detector, INSTALL IT. It will do nothing other then melt in it’s packaging. If you need help getting it installed, contact your local fire department for assistance. They MIGHT be able to help.




DO NOT REMOVE THE SMOKE DETECTOR OR BATTERIES FROM THE WALLS OR CEILINGS.

NOT SURE, GET HELP
When in doubt, call a neighbor, a friend, the fire department or your landlord for help maintaining or installing a smoke detector or carbon monoxide detector.

To many people “can’t stand the noise” and rip them off.

Return to: Smoke Alarm Part 1, Smoke Part 2, Carbon Monoxide, Fire Escape Plans, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Sprinklers



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